Large Scale Art

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Artist Spent a Year in the Woods Creating Mysterious Sculptures.

Deep in the woods of southern France, artist Spencer Byles transformed the forest into a mysterious wonderland through a series of spectacular, organic sculptures. Byles spent a year immersed in the woodlands of La Colle sur Loup, Villeneuve-Loubet, and Mougins for this ambitious project. Surrounded by flora and fauna, the sculptor used only cables and natural, found materials to create his stunning, large-scale works of art.

According to Byles, many people come across his sculptures by chance in the woods. Met with the sight of towering, woven structures and suspended symbols made of twined branches, the viewer may question whether the mysterious installations were formed naturally, assembled by human hands, or left in the forest by supernatural forces.

The ephemeral nature of Byles’ creations is integral to his work, as each piece exists in its completed state for only as long as the elements permit. The sculptor says, “The temporary nature of my sculptures is an important aspect of my experiences and understanding. I feel my sculptures are only really completed when nature begins to take hold again and gradually weave its way back into the materials. At this point it slowly becomes part of nature again and less a part of me.”

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Vancouver-based art student Fiona Tang creates large-scale trompe l’oeil drawings of animals that appear to burst forth from the paper upon which they were so expressively rendered. She uses a variety of materials to create these awesome optical illusions, including charcoal, acrylic paint, conté and chalk pastels.

We love the photos in which Tang poses with her pieces, emphasizing the effectiveness of her illusions. A large stag, with birds perched on his antlers, looks so solid that we’re still waiting to see steamy breath leave his nostrils. An enormous salt water crocodile raises its head from the rippling grey water in order to receive a gentle pat on the snout. A ferocious shark and powerful humpback whale emerge from opposite walls for an underwater face-off.

Follow Fiona Tang here on Tumblr to check out more of her eye-popping artwork.

[via My Modern Metropolis]

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Catastrophic Disasters Recreated as Layered Sculptures

sraeli artist Eyal Gever explores catastrophic events through his art. In his pieces known simply as Nuclear Bomb and Large Scale Smoke, he fabricates the fiery mushroom cloud that forms from an atomic explosion and the suffocating carbon and debris that billows from a volcanic eruption, respectively. Gever explains his fascination with disaster by saying, “My work captures and freezes catastrophic situations as cathartic experiences.”

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This stunning installation of 888,246 red ceramic poppies was created by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and stage designer Tom Piper in commemoration of the centennial of Britain’s involvement in World War I. Entitled Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red, each flower represents a British or Colonial military fatality.

This staggering installation is a work in progress, with the ceramic pippies being planted by volunteers in the dry moat that surrounds the Tower of London. The planting process began a few weeks ago and will continue throughout the summer until a final flower is symbolically planted on November 11, 2014.

Visit the Historic Royal Palaces website to learn more about this moving project. You can also follow the progress of the volunteer planters by following the #TowerPoppies on Twitter.

[via Colossal]

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2dots interview artist Xinjian Lu

As promised, here my interview with artist Xinjian Lu. In our interview, Xinjian Lu shared his artistic journey, thoughts on creativity, inspiration behind his paintings, favorite spot in Shanghai,  plus more. 

Read full interview HERE

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These awesome illuminated inflatable white rabbits are the work of Australian artist Amanda Parer for an installation entitled Intrude. In May 2014 the giant glowing bunnies were installed at the Vivid Festival of Light Sydney and next month they’ll be part of the Junction Arts Festival in Launceston, Tasmania.

Parer’s enormous and radiant rabbits, which stand 7 meters (~23 feet) tall, were created as a twofold response to the animals’ common occurrence in Australian fairytales as well as their invasive presence throughout Australia:

"These animals first travelled to Australia on the ships of the First Fleet and were brought ashore in cages in January 1788. These adaptable creatures quickly made themselves at home and eventually spread to almost every corner of the land. An Australian contradiction, Intrude represents the fairy-tale animals of our childhood – a furry innocence, frolicking through idyllic fields, while revealing their more serious and large-scale effect on the environment.”

Click here for additional images.

[via Lost At E Minor]

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Jorge Rodríguez-Gerada is a Cuban American contemporary artist.

Jorge specializes in making large-scale works out of art.
Read more at http://www.viralnova.com/jorge-rodriguez-gerada-art/#2A11uP20djBOJyld.99



He is a founder of the New York Culture Jamming movement and an innovator in the international urban art scene. Since the late 90´s he has been replacing the faces of cultural icons chosen by advertisers with the faces of anonymous people to question the controls imposed on public space, the role models designated and the type of events that are guarded by the collective memory. Rodríguez-Gerada´s unique direction was mentioned in Naomi Klein´s book No Logo and was a precursor of the use of anonymous portraits now common in street art. His spectacular interventions are created for the sake of bringing awareness to relevant social issues. His large scale time base works avoid negative impact on the environment, challenge the conformity in contemporary art and allow for a reflection that goes beyond the completion of the piece to focus in its concept, process, and the metaphor that comes forth because of the material chosen.

Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada, known for his monumentally scaled portraits in public spaces. The image depicted is of an anonymous Belfast girl and is so large it can only be viewed from the highest points in Belfast or an airplane.

Several years in the making, WISH was first plotted on a grid using state-of-the-art Topcon GPS technology and 30,000 manually placed wooden stakes in Belfast’s Titanic Quarter. The portrait was then “drawn” with aid of volunteers who helped place nearly 8 million pounds of natural materials including soil, sand, and rock over a period of four weeks. Rodríguez-Gerada says of the endeavor:

Working at very large scales becomes a personal challenge but it also allows me to bring attention to important social issues, the size of the piece is intrinsic to the value of its message. Creativity is always applied in order to define an intervention made only with local materials, with no environmental impact, that works in harmony with the location.

www.jorgerodriguezgerada.co

http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2013/10/wish-jorge-rodriguez-gerada-belfast/

http://www.viralnova.com/jorge-rodriguez-gerada-art/

3

I am incredibly proud and happy to have been a part of a such a large scale project that so many people were able to experience over the last couple months, and which from the start aimed to engage it’s audience in a socially responsible way- from the weekend crowds to the many students that were brought through during the weekly tours- bringing attention to blight in the city, telling the history of that place and the people that once were apart of it, while also transforming it into an inspirational, visual narrative, the whole time remaining free and open to the public. It’s exactly what I look to do with my work and am pushing to keep moving forward in the direction of large scale public art projects.

The wonderful Scott McKibben took these portraits of me with my two pieces at ExhibitBE, New Orleans. (last photo cropped and edited by me.)

Kate Hanrahan

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Ochi Gallery Show / NYE 2013 The Value of a Line - group show

Site specific kinetic drawings for @ochigallery  (http://ochigallery.com)

Emptied Gestures Series by Heather Hansen (http://heatherhansen.net)

photos by Spencer Hansen (http://spencerhansen.net)

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Hungarian artist Ervin Herve-Loranth has unleashed a giant on the city of Budapest. Entitled Feltépve (“Ripped up” or “Pop Up”), the cranky colossus is made of polystyrene and appears to be emerging from a secret subterranean lair beneath Szechenyi Square. He was created for Art Market Budapest, a 4-day-long international contemporary art fair.

Head over to We Love Budapest for additional images.

[via The Telegraph, The Huffington Post UK and We Love Budapest]

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Creative Spotlight: Xinjian Lu

Outstanding city blueprint paintings made by Shanghai-based artist Xinjian Lu. I got the the opportunity to interview artist Xinjian Lu and uncovered more about his work. I will post our interview soon.

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