Massive is an appropriate title for this anthology of Japanese gay manga artists, in more than one sense. Besides the larger-than-your-average-bear body types, the book highlights some of the biggest talent in the gay manga scene today. Names like Gengoroh Tagame, Jiraiya, and Seizoh Ebisubashi have chapters devoted to their lives, philosophies, and works, and we’ve got an appropriately sized 30-page excerpt to give you a taste of what you can look forward to in December!

After full-page, full-color photo portraits of each artist opposite their illustration style, we’ve got nine pages of the first featured artist, Gengoroh Tagame (田亀源五郎), including four pages from his manga, “Do You Remember South Island P.O.W. Camp?”

Finally! Nine months after our announcement and catalog listing for Massive: Gay Erotic Manga and the Men Who Make It—an English-language anthology of renowned gay erotic manga artists—we have the finished cover art for your viewing pleasure! We couldn’t be more excited to introduce this first-of-its-kind book, collecting photographs, essays, interviews, and illustrated work of nine of Japan’s most renowned artists making work for the gay male audience. Edited by writer/translator Anne Ishii and filmmaker Graham Kolbeins, the book will take you deep (ahem) into an aspect of Japanese subculture that is still fairly unknown in the English-speaking world.

We’ll be releasing more gay manga art goodness here and all over our social media networks in the next few days. Meanwhile, make sure to grab your pre-order copy of Massive here.

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These are some of the photos from Experimental Summer Camp 2008. Luke Gilford shot these beautiful photos for a project for MUSAC Museum in conjunction with FAKE magazine for the Frieze Art Fair in London.

It really was such an amazing, beautiful week. There were so many talented people that converged during this week at our new home in Tennessee. Myself, Rya Kleinpeter, Layard Thompson, Luke Gilford, Maryann Haggerty,  Graham Kolbeins, David Toro, Solomon Chase, Daniel Rehnberg, and Billy Kaufman.

Graham Kolbeins was either just beginning, or in the planning stages of his brilliant, critical website Future Shipwreck. Also check out his badass tumblr Future Shipwreck Lite.

David Toro and Solomon Chase were very excited about this project they were going to begin when they got back to NYC called Dis Magazine. I had no idea what a juggernaut it was going to turn into! It’s brilliant and these two boys totally deserve every bit of success and accolades.

Daniel Rehnberg had just completed a cross country documentary film about second hand commerce entitled National Treasures.

Not to mention Rya and I had just relocated our lives from Los Angeles to Tennessee. Whenever I think of the term magic (as an actual, physical thing brought on by serious intentions….not some special effects out of a sci fi movie)…this week always comes to mind.

What a beautiful week, and these photos….I’m so glad they exist…..

4

Hungry Bottom Comics feels like a gust of fresh air whooshing in from the friendly frozen north. Canadian cartoonist Eric Kostiuk Williams’ dazzling autobiographical comics offer an unabashedly frank, uproariously funny glimpse into the author’s own journey as a young and fabulous gay man finding his way in the world. From the joy of escaping to the big, gay city and dancing at the club to the alienation of anonymous hookups in a digital age, Williams captures it all in sumptuous Sharpie lines and elegant cross-hatching.

Through joyous flights of fancy, Williams mixes high and low cultural references: Jean Genet sings Rihanna; Beyonce and Yoko Ono swap lives, Freaky Friday style; and personal saints like Mykki Blanco and Claude Cahun offer wisdom, insight and encouragement. These stars make up a constellation of queer icons that shines down on Williams as he catwalks through the uncertainty of early adulthood. Art becomes an escape from the shame and contempt directed at his femininity, seeping in from the outside world.”

Check out the rest of Graham Kolbeins’ lovely write-up on Future Shipwreck. Thanks, Graham!

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Jezebel is featuring an incredible video today called ‘Food Horror’, made by Graham Kolbeins from Future Shipwreck. The video examines the way that food and the eating of food is treated within the television show Pretty Little Liars, both overtly (Hannah’s history with eating disorders) and covertly (the looks and comments that characters get when they eat). He shows how food is often associated with disgust, suspicion, and outright horror through this compilation of clips from the show’s run. I don’t watch the show, but this was disturbing and almost unbelievable. Definitely worth a watch. The way eating is portrayed in the clips could be triggering for eating disorders, so watch with caution. Kolbeins description is below:

I’m a big fan of the ABC Family show Pretty Little Liars. It’s an endurance piece about four millennial girls under constant surveillance, trapped in a feedback loop of dramatic glances and threatening text messages in an endlessly autumnal studio back lot approximation of an American small town. A faceless, omnipotent cyber-bully named “A,” who may or may not be the girls’ (dead) best frenemy, Allison DeLaurentis, fucks with them on the daily. No secret is safe and no moment is ever private from “A.”

Much ofPretty Little Liarsmakes little to no sense, but it always manages to reel me in with its hypnotic, fugue-like tone. I’ve been thoroughly entertained by its 70 episodes to date, so I’m being a friend when I say this,Pretty Little Liars: y’all got some fucked up food politics.

InFood Horror, I set out to examine the many moments inPretty Little Liars’ first three seasons that stigmatize food, whether it’s presented with a feeling of unease, danger, or overt rejection. Aside from the 16 minutes of “food horror” I’ve compiled above, there are a countless dining scenes where food is conspicuously absent—often supplanted by the girls’ favorite diuretic, coffee. Sometimes they simply sit in front of a plate of prop salad and ignore it.

The show’s narrative touches on eating disorders in season one, when it’s revealed via flashback that Ashley Benson’s character, “Hefty” Hannah Marin, is a recovering bulimic. Her food issues were at the crux of her relationship with friend-slash-tormentor Allison, who once counseled Hannah on how to throw up: “I can show you how to get rid of it.” This small effort to work bulimia into the show’s discourse feels like a hollow gesture, since much ofPretty Little Liarsreads like a how-to guide on making it through a meal without taking a bite.

It’s important to consider cultural messaging about health, body image and beauty embedded within entertainment targeting young girls. In 2012, Internet outrage lead social networks like Tumblr and Pinterest to adopt policiescensoring individuals with eating disordersfrom sharing “thinspiration” tips. Silencing these organic online communities is an easy way to feel like we’re addressing eating disorders, but it does nothing to fix the systemic problems that allow body shame to permeate for-profit entertainment products aimed at women.

Shout out to Ashley Benson for killing it in theSpring Breakerspart Emma Roberts reportedly left because she refused to gain 15 pounds for the role. Shout outs to Christian Marclay, Rainer Werner Fassbiner, gainers, Netflix, Rich Juzwiak and YouTube (the form, not the actual service).

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Rad Queers: Edie Fake

from Graham Kolbeins

The third episode of Rad Queers delves into the ornately patterned worlds of brilliant Chicago artist Edie Fake. Through comics like Gaylord Phoenix, a long-running series about an anthropomorphic bird on a fantastical quest for self-discovery, Fake explores issues of his own trans identity and sexuality. In his solo show at Thomas Robertello Gallery, Memory Palaces, the artist investigates historical Chicago queer and feminist spaces and resurrects them with a Utopian spin!

radqueers.com
ediefake.com
ediefake.tumblr.com

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"RAD QUEERS" — great profile on our friend Edie Fake by Graham Kolbeins

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Here’s a very cool film about Ian MacKinnon by filmmaker Graham Kolbeins, part of his new project Rad Queers.  I’m looking forward to future projects by both of these guys.

vimeo

Rad Queers: Edie Fake

by Graham Kolbeins

The third episode of Rad Queers delves into the ornately patterned worlds of brilliant Chicago artist Edie Fake. Through comics like Gaylord Phoenix, a long-running series about an anthropomorphic bird on a fantastical quest for self-discovery, Fake explores issues of his own trans identity and sexuality. In his solo show at Thomas Robertello Gallery, Memory Palaces, the artist investigates historical Chicago queer and feminist spaces and resurrects them with a Utopian spin!

radqueers.com
ediefake.com
ediefake.tumblr.com

La Comic Con de San Diego se profile. La présence LGBT y est non négligeable, au point que l’association Prism Comics publie au format pdf un guide de “tout ce qui est queer” sous le titre The Gay Agenda. On peut le consulter en cliquant ce lien. On notera que Graham Kolbeins, qui a mis en ligne cette information sur son site Gay Manga, participera au panel “Gays in Comics”, une institution de la San Diego Comic Con puisque lancée (et longtemps animée) par Andy Mangels en 1988. Ce sera donc la 27e édition de cet événement hautement symbolique de la visibilité LGBT dans la BD américaine.

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