2

Windson Low Tech

Plaus/Den Kit

An exercise in plausible deniability: We are composing a set of items that help us GTFO of urban environments should the need arise. Think HVT hostage situations or comparable in non-permissive environments. Carry everything you need in such a situation to at least get out of restraints, closed confinements, and be able to run. You will be searched; more or less cursory. Everything that can’t be explained away is out. No carbon fiber and no Zirconium dioxide. No dedicated tools. Handcuff keys? Nope.

Pictured is a sample collection of stuff that just happens to be useful, if you know how to use/combine/create further tools from the ingredients:

  • Bobby pins
  • Safety pin, large/small
  • Paper clip, large/small
  • Paper fastener
  • Plastic wrapper band
  • Electric fuse
  • P-38

Here is some tradecraft: In a suit, you won’t be able to explain away most of even these items. But in a casual jacket, you just worked on your car, house, whatever; all of that, kept loose in a pocket, doesn’t arouse suspicion. The trick is to carry it wrapped in the cloth, it’s small and light, but as a bundle, it becomes suspicious. So, whenever a potentially tricky situation is to be expected—just open the safety pin and sprinkle the contents inside the pocket. It becomes just a bunch of unrelated stuff.

Also non-suspicious:

  • Dental floss
  • An old credit card
  • A piece of leader wire
  • A couple small zip ties
  • Nails
  • CD/DVDs are nice to have, if they make any sense in a pocket dump.

That’s about it. Bring any dedicated GTFO tool or implement and you will be treated quite differently, you’ll lose any element of surprise and won’t even have left the makeshift tools above.

Rule: The more you bring, the less you’ll have left.

No:

  • Light sticks
  • Metal saw
  • Handcuff keys
  • Lockpicks
  • Diamond wire

Observe – Evaluate – Control
[Windson How Tos] | [Limited Edition Patches]

Eye on Helmand by Marines
Via Flickr:
Lance Cpl. Madison DeLoach, crew chief, Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 363 (HMH-363), observes the terrain during a routine flight operation, Helmand River Valley, Helmand province, Afghanistan, Jan. 5, 2012. HMH-363 conducted flight operations in support of troops throughout the Helmand Province. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Robert R. Carrasco)

Science in Sport GO Isotonic Energy.

Iv posted about these gels before they are great to have in your kit. One main advantage of them is you do not need to have them with water.

They give you just enough of an energy boost when you need it. I carry x2 in HPG kit bag while out on SAR and a couple more in my pack.

Available from www.top-of-the-range.co.uk