Farrah Field

I’m trying to let go of my need for tight narrative, trying let go of my need to get out of a poem in some strange way. I’m trying to teach myself to stay in the poem, to look around and hold my breath.

I hope I keep writing things that surprise me, instead of falling into the trap of recreating old surprises.
—  Zachary Schomburg, interviewed by Farrah Field
Tonight at Housing Works in NYC

Tonight, June 12, at 7 pm, Cynthia Cruz (The Glimmering Room), Farrah Field (Rising, Wolf and Pilot) and poets from Birds, LLC, Belladonna, Black Square Editions, and Futurepoem, will be reading at the FACE OUT Reading & Reception: Maximizing the Visibility of Emerging Writers event at Housing Works (126 Crosby St.) in NYC. Hope you can come!

The Glimmering Room, Rising and Wolf and Pilot are all available from Four Way Books

You Are My Friend, Goodbye

image

(photo by Farrah Field)

I had a beautiful weekend reading in Boston and New York w/ Zach, Paige, Luke, Wendy, and Farnoosh. That is Farnoosh introducing me with her harmonica she found on the ground. She played a song called “You Are My Friend, Goodbye” while I shook all the audiences’ hands and said “You Are My Friend, Goodbye”. That was great.

It was wonderful to see finally see Berl’s Poetry Shop. This is one of the store owners, the poet Farrah Field, wearing her Constitution dress.

image

 (photo by Ben Pease)

I am run down. I’ve been teaching, packing, moving out of my apartment, sleeping on couches and wherever else i can.  Now I’m in the wind. But I’m so happy to get to be around so many amazing and kind people. 

"Amy Check On My Square Inch of Land"

"Amy Check On My Square Inch of Land" by Farrah Field

You didn’t win the Cyndi Lauper look-alike contest
at the skating rink. Pretending to understand 

you’re in therapy. How long do you spend
thinking about women’s arms.

We were supposed to do it 23 times before we broke up.
To honor the day we met.

Suddenly everyone values
at home child care
now that men do it.

You want someone you don’t have to care about
because you’re in love with a dead man.

At the end of every summer you can’t
remember the last time you wore pants.

PW Poetry Reviews: September 2012

It’s a big season for big books from big poets, so here’s a roundup of collecteds, plus a bunch of new volumes reviewed:

COLLECTED COLLECTEDS

Poems 1962-2012 by Louise Gluck (Ecco/ FSG)

Later Poems: Selected and New 1971-2012 by Adrienne Rich (Norton)

The Poems of Octavio Paz edited and trans. by Eliot Weinberger (New Directions)

AND SOME GREAT NEW REGULAR-SIZE BOOKS:

Wolf and Pilot by Farrah Field (Four Way)

The Two Yvonnes by Jessica Greenbaum (Princeton)

The Selvage by Linda Gregerson (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

Woman Without Umbrella by Victoria Redel (Four Way)

Nervous Device by Catherine Wagner (City Lights)

Stag’s Leap by Sharon Olds (Knopf)

Manhater by Danielle Pafunda (Dusie)

Journey to the Sun by Brent Cunningham (Atelos)

Sweet Spot by J.T. Barbarese (Northwestern)

BERL'S POETRY SHOP: GRAND OPENING

image

Some things are almost too good to bear. Berl’s Brooklyn Poetry Shop in Dumbo has been open for about a month–as of this weekend, they’ll be open even more. The store’s proprietors are first-rate literary citizens Farrah Field and Jared White; they’re also both absolutely stunning poets.

On November 2nd they’re celebrating poetry with a day of readings from some of the best voices around (including a few of our very own Face Out grantees). You won’t want to miss this. Full line-up below, but make sure you check out their website too.

***

Come to Berl’s Grand Opening!

November 2, 2013 

We’re a poetry-only bookstore in Brooklyn! We’ve been open for about a month, we’ve had many great events so far, and we’ll be more open after this! 

Come celebrate our love of poetry! Featuring readings by 
Sasha Fletcher
Sampson Starkweather
Latasha N Nevada Diggs
Julian Brolaski
Idra Novey
Franklin Bruno
Christian Hawkey
Alex Dimitrov
Paige Taggart
Rosebud Ben-oni
Lee Ann Brown
Joanna Fuhrman
Stephanie Berger
Stacy Szymaszek
Dan Magers
Bianca Stone
Timothy Donnelly
Rachel Eliza Griffiths
Edmund Berrigan
Abigail Deutsch
Laura Sims
Ana Božičević
Jason Koo
… and more!

Event begins around 3 and the readings will be begin around 4. 
Browsing and buying poetry happens all day long!

November 2, 2013
126A Front Street
Dumbo, Brooklyn
3-7 pm

Please help us spread the word!

Amy Check On My Square Inch of Land

(by Farrah Field)

You didn’t win the Cyndi Lauper look-alike contest
at the skating rink. Pretending to understand

you’re in therapy. How long do you spend
thinking about women’s arms.

We were supposed to do it 23 times before we broke up.
To honor the day we met.

Suddenly everyone values
at home child care
now that men do it.

You want someone you don’t have to care about
because you’re in love with a dead man.

At the end of every summer you can’t
remember the last time you wore pants.

Review of "Wolf and Pilot" by Farrah Field by Elisa Gabbert for "Lemon Hound"

"Farrah Field’s [poetry] reveals patterns of feeling: the magic spell she casts to shrink life-size hurt and terror into something you could hold in your hand, put in a locket." Read the full review here

Wolf and Pilot and Rising are available from Four Way Books

Amy Check On My Square Inch of Land


by Farrah Field

You didn’t win the Cyndi Lauper look-alike contest
at the skating rink. Pretending to understand 

you’re in therapy. How long do you spend
thinking about women’s arms.

We were supposed to do it 23 times before we broke up.
To honor the day we met.

Suddenly everyone values
at home child care
now that men do it.

You want someone you don’t have to care about
because you’re in love with a dead man.

At the end of every summer you can’t
remember the last time you wore pants.

Farrah Field is the author of Rising (Four Way Books, 2009) and the chapbook Parents (Immaculate Disciples Press, 2011). Her poems and essays have appeared in many publications including Sixth Finch, Ploughshares, Harp & Altar, Lit, Typo, La Petite Zine, and Drunken Boat. Two of her poems were selected by Kevin Young for The Best American Poetry 2011. Her essays and reviews have appeared in Harp & Altar and Coldfront. She lives in Brooklyn where she co-hosts an event series called Yardmeter Editions. She occasionally blogs at adultish.blogspot.com and is co-owner of Berl’s Brooklyn Poetry Shop.

Wolf and Pilot, by Farrah Field

image

Here’s an older blurb-ish type review I wrote of Farrah Fields amazing Wolf and Pilot:

If you only read this book for the line, “She threw one of her feet at us and never lost her balance,” you will not be disappointed. This book is full of such amazing lines that make even better poems. The mystery, darkness, emotional depth and downright awesomeness is pretty great, too. Read it! “The rye will tickle your nipples.”

youtube

Farrah Field reads “How to Clean a Cast-Iron Skillet” at Unnameable Books in Brooklyn.

Blue Is Beautiful Amy but the Story Is So the '90s by Farrah Field

I wanted to be the one who thought of truck bed walls.

You locked yourself in the bathroom

so I couldn’t brush my teeth before bed.

Where is this going and will it be successful? I hate bullies.

She’s been everywhere she even heard

the shot that killed John Lennon.

From now on I’m sticking up

for myself. My notes and to-do’s have flowers.

I don’t want to die. I feel scared all the time.

What you looked like as a child is clear.

The way you run from the hot tub

and throw yourself in the pool.

When they were joining the EU.

I worry about mine.

Have you ever seen your own cervix?

You’re like a natural matzoh ball maker.

Why did I ever want to be in the couple

with the white walls three shoes and lots of art.

Scarves from museum shops.

I sat your kid on my counter

and we spilled food everywhere.

The nickname grandchildren give is the one you die with.

Everyone wanted to see a movie where the woman turns to stone.

They say Maria Falconetti never acted again.

The gym was impossible after I fell on my knee.

I walked up to you and cried.

Why do you treat your son better than your daughter.

Talk about something else like did anyone ever call you bro.