50 Random Hetalia Asks!!!
  • 1:What got you into Hetalia?
  • 2:What month and year did you first start watching it?
  • 3:Who is your favourite character currently?
  • 4:If you could have one ship become canon, what pairing would it be?
  • 5:Do you like Hetalia yaoi?
  • 6:How has Hetalia affected history for you?
  • 7:What do you prefer and why: Axis or Allies?
  • 8:Hetalia OTP?
  • 9:Do any of your friends like Hetalia?
  • 10:Are you caught up with all of the episodes?
  • 11:Which Hetalia-related merchandise (official and unofficial) do you own?
  • 12:Do you read any fanfics and if so, what's your favourite one?
  • 13:How have you contributed to the fandom?
  • 14:What popular ship do you not like?
  • 15:What unpopular ship do you like?
  • 16:Who was the first character you instantly fell in love with?
  • 17:What episode gave you the most feels?
  • 18:What episode gave you the most laughs?
  • 19:What is your favourite episode in general?
  • 20:Do you have any crossover ships with any Hetalia characters?
  • 21:What is your favourite Hetaloid song?
  • 22:Thoughts on HetaOni? Have you played it?
  • 23:Is Germany the Holy Roman Empire?
  • 24:Any character you don't like in particular?
  • 25:Do you roleplay any characters on Tumblr, Facebook, Twitter, Omegle, etc?
  • 26:Who would be the one character you would love to meet?
  • 27:Do you recognize Sealand as a country?
  • 28:If you could ask Himaruya one question only, what would it be?
  • 29:Do you cosplay any of the characters from Hetalia?
  • 30:If you had the ability to change your height, shape, voice, clothing, and even gender, who would be your dream Hetalia cosplay?
  • 31:Look at the country you are currently living in. If they are an official Hetalia character, how do you feel about that character, as well as the country itself?
  • 32:What are some Hetalia OC's (Original Characters) you have made up?
  • 33:What are some of your biggest headcanons?
  • 34:What is the one thing about the fandom that irks you the most?
  • 35:Your favourite seiyuu/voice actor in the Sub or the Dub?
  • 36:Are you a HetaStuck? Thoughts on it?
  • 37:Is Hetalia the biggest fandom you are in? If not, what is?
  • 38:How much has Hetalia taken over your life?
  • 39:What is your favourite fan-made video or tribute you've ever seen?
  • 40:Do you think Prussia is awesome?
  • 41:Personality-wise, which character are you like the most?
  • 42:How do you feel about the Nordics?
  • 43:How do you feel about the "cult" around Germany?
  • 44:Any crack pairings?
  • 45:Will you ever leave the Hetalia fandom?
  • 46:Are you glad that you started watching Hetalia?
  • 47:What did you do before starting to watch Hetalia?
  • 48:Have you read the Web Comic, watched the Anime, both, or neither?
  • 49:What is the thing in general that you absolutely love about Hetalia?
  • 50:If you could have one wish granted that was Hetalia-related, what would it be?
6

December 17, 1944: Internment of Japanese-Americans Comes to an End.

On December 17th, 1944 the United States under the direction of U.S. Major General Henry C. Pratt issued Public Proclamation No. 21 stating that on January 2nd, 1945 all Japanese-Americans “evacuees” from the West Coast could return back to their homes.

The internment of Japanese-Americans began exactly ten weeks after the Empire of Japan bombed Pearl Harbor. Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which gave authorization for the removal of any or all people from military areas. As a result the military defined the entire West Coast, home to a majority of Japanese-Americans as military area. Within a couple of months over 110,000 Japanese-Americans were relocated to internment camps built by the US military scattered all over the nation. For the next two years Japanese-Americans would live under dire living conditions and at times abuse from their military guards.

Throughout World War II ten people were found to be spies for the Empire of Japan, not one of them was of Japanese ancestry. Forty-four year would pass until Ronald Reagan and the United States made an official apology to the surviving Japanese-Americans who were relocated, and were given $20,000 tax-free.

Random APH Fact Of The Day #40

The characters with canon heights are,

  • Italy- 5’7.7”
  • Germany - 5’11”
  • Japan - 5’5
  • America - 5’9.6”
  • England - 5’9
  • France - 5’9
  • Russia - 5’11.6”
  • China - 5’6.5”
  • Belarus - 5’3 (estimated)
  • Finland - 5’7
  • Holy Roman Empire - 3’2
  • Hungary - 5’3
  • Latvia - 4’7 (est.)
  • Prussia - 5’9-5’10 (est.)
  • Sealand - 4’3.2”
  • Sweden - 5’11.6”
  • Taiwan - 4’11 (est)
Eleven Difficult & Painful Things

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Sources:

1) http://www.pixiv.net/member_illust.php?mode=medium&illust_id=4851097

2) 【仏】ラクガキ【あ子】

Pixiv ID: 20113455
Member: ふみ

3) ちび

Pixiv ID: 8636512
Member: ひろゆ

4) Pixiv ID: 32623367
Member: Hyoko

5) ID: 24815413
Member: とーり

6) Pixiv ID: 25086209
Member: Zuzu

7) 【ヘタリア】時をこえて

Pixiv ID: 6247288
Member: marow@ついった

8) おかえりなさい

Old Pixiv ID: 6460795
Member: 朝日レン太

9) Pixiv ID: 16160571
Member: 楽花

10) http://hetaliasse.deviantart.com/art/Belarus-X-Russia-189553148

11) http://aster-lili.deviantart.com/art/discard-200753045

Hetalian First Dances

Germany and Italy:

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Spain and Romano:

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France and Canada:

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Canada and Prussia:

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Lichtenstein and Netherlands:

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Hungary and Prussia:

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Joan and France:

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Japan and Greece:

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Lithuania and Poland:

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Austria and Hungary:

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Sweden and Finland:

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China and Russia:

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Norway and Denmark:

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Iceland and Seychelles:

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Roma and Germania:

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England and America:

this last one….describes their personalities so much

Japanese sailors pose for a photograph against the backdrop of the battleship Fusō. During the Battle of Surigao Strait in the Philippines, the Fusō was torpedoed and sunk by the USS Melvin (DD-680), a Fletcher-class destroyer on 25 October 1944. Only a few dozen men survived the rapid foundering and oil fire. There is evidence that some of these were rescued by the destroyer Asagumo, which was itself sunk a short time later. It is also possible that some who escaped the sinking reached the island of Leyte only to be killed by Filipinos, as is known to have happened to survivors from other Japanese warships sunk in the Battle of Surigao Strait. In all, only ten crew members are known to have survived, all of whom returned to Japan. Kure, Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan. May 1943.

Glass dish unearthed in Nara came from Roman Empire

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KASHIHARA, Nara Prefecture—A glass dish unearthed from a burial mound here is the first of its kind confirmed to have come to Japan from the Roman Empire, a research team said.

A round cut glass bowl, discovered with the glass plate, was found to have originated in Sassanid Persia (226-651), the researchers said.

The dish and bowl were retrieved together from the No. 126 tumulus of the Niizawa Senzuka cluster of ancient graves, a national historic site. The No. 126 tumulus dates back to the late fifth century.

The researchers’ scientific studies show that fifth-century Japan imported glasswork, and that there was a wide range of trade between the East and the West. Read more.

Rangoon, Burma. 8 August 1945. A young ethnic Chinese woman who was in one of the Imperial Japanese Army’s “comfort stations” is interviewed by an Allied officer
Comfort women were women and girls forced into a prostitution corps created by the Empire of Japan. The name “comfort women” is a translation of a Japanese name ianfu (慰安婦). Ianfu is a euphemism for shōfu (娼婦) whose meaning is “prostitute(s)”.

Estimates vary as to how many women were involved, with numbers ranging from as low as 20,000 from some Japanese scholars to as high as 410,000 from some Chinese scholars, but the exact numbers are still being researched and debated. A majority of the women were from Korea, China, Japan and the Philippines, although women from Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, Taiwan, Indonesia and other Japanese-occupied territories were used for military “comfort stations”. Stations were located in Japan, China, the Philippines, Indonesia, then Malaya, Thailand, Burma, New Guinea, Hong Kong, Macau, and French Indochina.

According to testimony, young women from countries under Japanese Imperial control were abducted from their homes. In many cases, women were also lured with promises of work in factories or restaurants. Once recruited, the women were incarcerated in “comfort stations” in foreign lands. A Dutch government study described how the Japanese military itself recruited women by force in the Dutch East Indies. It revealed that a total of 300 Dutch women had been coerced into Japanese military sex slavery.