Doctor-Frankenstein

Ode on Intimations of Immortality
  • Ode on Intimations of Immortality
  • William Wordsworth read by Harry Treadaway
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Victor Frankenstein (Harry Treadaway) once loved poetry before he sought to pierce the veil between life and death. Hear how much in his reading of William Wordsworth’s “Ode on Intimations of Immortality”.

“There was a time when meadow, grove, and stream,
The earth, and every common sight,
To me did seem
Apparell’d in celestial light,
The glory and the freshness of a dream.
It is not now as it hath been of yore;—
Turn wheresoe'er I may,
By night or day,
The things which I have seen I now can see no more.

The rainbow comes and goes,
And lovely is the rose;
The moon doth with delight
Look round her when the heavens are bare;
Waters on a starry night
Are beautiful and fair;
The sunshine is a glorious birth;
But yet I know, where'er I go,
That there hath pass’d away a glory from the earth.

[…]—But there’s a tree, of many, one,
A single field which I have look’d upon,
Both of them speak of something that is gone:
The pansy at my feet
Doth the same tale repeat:
Whither is fled the visionary gleam?
Where is it now, the glory and the dream?