DJ Pete Rock

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Stussy x Marvel - DJ Pete Rock

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Video: Stussy x Marvel – DJ Pete Rock

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dope vid

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Je viens de tomber sur un Live de DJ Premier VS DJ Pete Rock qui nous font un “Back In Days” avec du James Brown et l'historique musical de la Motown. AWESOME !

Watch on rezboallah.tumblr.com
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DJ Premier vs DJ Pete Rock - #ChillinHardApproved

Haze & Hurley Capsule Collection and Pop-up shop

New on http://www.cottonfreaks.com/2013/08/15/haze-hurley-capsule-collection-and-pop-up-shop/

Haze & Hurley Capsule Collection and Pop-up shop

Haze the street art icon collabarates with Hurley on a capsule collection. The collection consists of a limited edition tees and hats, featuring Haze’s design signature red, white and black color palette.
The pop-up shop brings a lot of festivities next to it, music by the notorious DJ Pete Rock and Haze. Also appearing are Craig Steyk and pro skaters Greyson Fletcher and Curren Caples. Every guest that makes a purchase from the collection or from Hurley in-store during the event get’s a free live screenprinted Hurley & Haze tee. Yeah

PacSun NYC Pop-Up shop
583 Broadway
New York, NY 10012
United States

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The Chocolate Boy Wonder DJ Pete Rock used to by comics like me. 

Imagination might be scarier than reality … but not by much.- James Siegel

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Stussy x Marvel Comics – DJ Pete Rock

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Nas - “ILLMATIC” Album Release Press Kit (1994)  

Jazz & Hip-Hop


Venez lire l'article sur Musiculture
Beaucoup est dit sur la culture hip-hop depuis plusieurs années, souvent en mal. On entend même des soi-disant adeptes de cette culture cracher un peu dessus. S'il est vrai que la production d'albums rap connait un sérieux ralentissement, et ce n'est pas forcement un mal, le rap est toujours là, puissant, créatif.

http://www.musiculture.fr/jazz-hip-hop/

Pete Rock Tribute: James Brown

If there’s even been a beat spun from a James Brown bridge then Pete Rock’s strained the impurities and let the needle drop on a tribute, dished out in a consommé of the Soul Brother Number One.

Former one-half of Pete Rock & CL Smooth, The legendary DJ and producer Pete Rock rinses a crate of vinyls on this tribute, chopping and screwing the breaks behind the funk that shaped the Godfather of Soul’s legend. 

This tribute breaks hip-hop down to its foundations of James Brown, the J.B.’s and the driving bass of the Collins brothers (Bootsy and Catfish) before they went Funkadelic leaving Fred Wesley to the reigns of Brown’s signature funk that founded the samples and records cut to make some of hip-hop’s most classic tracks bang. Over loops to Rakim’s “I Know You Got Soul” from Bobby Byrd and the J.B’s, to Rob Base & DJ EZ Rock’s screaming “It Takes Two” to Das EFX’s sewer-creepin’ bassline and the brass of Fred Wes’ “Blind Man Can See It” to make that Black Caesar “Paid The Cost To Be The Boss” gangster shit on Nas’ “Get On Up”, Rock steals the wheels to illustrate how time-framing James Brown’s music is in the annuls of hip-hop’s 40 plus year history. 

Pete Rock released this tribute mix to run with the James Brown biopic, Get On Up, in theaters now. The producer had this to say about the legend James Brown:

“When I met James Brown, I think he passed along something to me when I shook his hand. I look at that today, and I say, “Damn, I think James Brown gave me a piece of his [soul] power.” He came to Mount Vernon and he did a concert with Bobby Bird and The J.B.’s in my hood at a spot called the Left Bank. And I’m telling you I've never seen Mount Vernon so poppin’ in my entire life! It was always poppin’–don’t get it twisted–because we used to do little parties in the hood and stuff like that and everybody would come out. But James Brown — I mean I was seven years old, me and my brother Grap, and we walked in the joint and my mother talked to one of James’ bodyguards or managers or something and was asking him, “Yo, can my kids meet James?” And the next thing you know, he came up behind us and I shook his hand and he was like, “God bless you man, God bless you.” And he shook my mother’s hand and he shook my brother’s hand. And it left something with me. This was before he got on stage. He shook our hands and then we watched the show. And I left that place not the same. So you see how strong black music can be. It had a heavy impact on me in my life.”