African-Americans-in-the-war-effort

It is likely that at no time in American history, except for the Civil War, has there been a concerted effort by one faction of Americans to decimate the economy and work tirelessly for the government’s failure and demise; all because Americans elected an African American man as their President. The President’s contribution in exposing the fascist un-American efforts by Republicans is that he has stayed the course with grace and dignity despite an overwhelming and concerted effort to destroy his Presidency. In fact, although Republicans did not say, like the filthy Rush Limbaugh, that they hope the President fails, they have made every effort to see Limbaugh’s hopes come to fruition.

Whether they met in private to plot against Obama’s effort to save the economy, tried to destroy the full faith and credit of the United States, kill millions of Americans’ jobs, or withhold funding for diplomatic security around the world, Republicans have shown their true nature and it is contrary to what any sane American would call patriotic. Through it all, this President wrongly asserted that “Republicans are patriots; they just have a different idea about how to govern.” Nice words, but untrue and the President probably knows that sad fact.

No American patriot, regardless their political affiliation, deliberately and with malice aforethought, attempts to harm this country or its people, or conspires with foreign governments and agents to push Americans into a war of convenience or destroy its precious environment and endanger the health of its people. On this Presidents’ Day, one hopes that the current President continues asserting his agenda for Americans and finds the fortitude to tell the American people what many already know; Republicans are not patriots, they do not love America, and have nothing but contempt for its people. If President Obama would do that, he will go down as the one of nation’s greatest Presidents for, if nothing else, identifying this country’s real enemy.

THE SONG JOHN BROWN’S BODY - WHERE DID IT COME FROM?

FROM THE CIVIL WAR TO WORLD WAR II THIS SONG HAS INSPIRED MANY VERSIONS-THE TUNE EVENTUALLY BECOMING THE “BATTLE HYMN OF THE REPUBLIC” MANY HAVE CLAIMED CREDIT!

According to an 1890 account, the original John Brown lyrics were a collective effort by a group of Union soldiers who were referring both to the famous John Brown and also, humorously, to a Sergeant John Brown of their own battalion. Various other authors have published additional verses and/or claimed credit for originating the John Brown lyrics and tune.

At a flag-raising ceremony at Fort Warren, near Boston, on Sunday May 12, 1861, the John Brown song was publicly played “perhaps for the first time”. The American Civil War had begun the previous month.

Newspapers reported troops singing the song as they marched in the streets of Boston on July 18, 1861, and there were a “rash” of broadside printings of the song with substantially the same words as the undated John Brown Song! broadside, stated by Kimball to be the first published edition, and the broadside with music by C. S. Marsh copyrighted on July 16, 1861, also published by C.S. Hall . Other publishers also came out with versions of the John Brown Song and claimed copyright.

  • Some researchers have maintained that the tune’s roots go back to a “Negro folk song”, an African-American wedding song from Georgia
  • An African-American version was recorded as “We’ll hang Jeff Davis from a sour Apple Tree”.
  • Anecdotes indicate that versions of “Say, Brothers” were sung as part of African American ring shouts; appearance of the hymn in this call-and-response setting with singing, clapping, stomping, dancing, and extended ecstatic choruses may have given impetus to the development of the well known “Glory hallelujuah” chorus.
  • Given that the tune was developed in an oral tradition, it is impossible to say for certain which of these influences may have played a specific role in the creation of this tune 

The tune was later also used for “The Battle Hymn of the Republic (written in November 1861, published in February 1862; this song was directly inspired by “John Brown’s Body”), “Marching Song of the First Arkansas,” “The Battle Hymn of Cooperation,” “Bummers, Come and Meet Us” , and many other related texts and knock-offs during and immediately after the American Civil War period.

SOURCES: George Kimball, “Origin of the John Brown Song”, New England Magazine, new series 1 (1890) , Blood on the Risers From Wikipedia, James Fuld, 2000 The Book of World-Famous Music: Classical, Popular, and Folk Courier Dover, Pg 32. 

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Today in 1973, the USS Jesse L. Brown frigate was commissioned by the U.S. Navy, named in honor of Jesse LeRoy Brown, an African American naval officer who was killed during the Korean War.

Born in 1926 in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, Brown became the first African American aviator in the Navy, earning his pilot’s wings in 1948. He served aboard the USS Leyte and played an active role in the Battle of Chosin Reservoir in late 1950.

Tragically, his plane was shot down behind enemy lines during the fighting. Efforts were made to save Brown, who survived the initial crash, but he died of his injuries before he could be extracted from his plane. He was posthumously awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Purple Heart Medal, and the Air Medal.


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Medgar Wiley Evers
July 2, 1925
Decatur, Mississippi, U.S.

He was an African-American civil rights activist from Mississippi involved in efforts to overturn segregation at the University of Mississippi. After returning from overseas military service in World War II and completing his secondary education, he became active in the civil rights movement. He became a field secretary for the NAACP.

Evers was assassinated by Byron De La Beckwith, a member of the White Citizens’ Council. As a veteran, Evers was buried with full military honors at Arlington National Cemetery. His murder and the resulting trials inspired civil rights protests, as well as numerous works of art, music, and film.

"Breaking a tradition of 167 years, the U.S. Marine Corps started enlisting Negroes on June 1, 1942. The first class of 1,200 Negro volunteers began their training 3 months later as members of the 51st Composite Defense Battalion at Montford Point, a section of the 200-square-mile Marine Base, Camp Lejeune, at New River, NC. The first Negro to enlist was Howard P. Perry, shown here." [x]

Red Gold . Innovators & Pioneers . Charles Drew
pbs.org

1904 
1950 
American
surgeon and blood researcher

Charles R. Drew was a renowned surgeon, teacher, and researcher. He was responsible for founding two of the world’s largest blood banks. Because of his …

Charles R. Drew was a renowned surgeon, teacher, and researcher. He was responsible for founding two of the world’s largest blood banks. Because of his research into the storage and shipment of blood plasma — blood without cells — he is credited with saving the lives of hundreds of Britons during World War II. He was director of the first American Red Cross effort to collect and bank blood on a large scale. In 1942, a year after he was made a diplomat of surgery by the American Board of Surgery at Johns Hopkins University, he became the first African American surgeon to serve as an examiner on the board.

[Day 23 #BlackHistorySeries ] #HenryHighlandGarnet (December 23, 1815 – February 13, 1882) was an African abolitionist, minister, educator and orator. An advocate of militant abolitionism, Garnet was a prominent member of the movement that led beyond moral suasion toward more political action. Renowned for his skills as a public speaker, he urged blacks to take action and claim their own destinies. For a period, he supported emigration of American free blacks to Mexico, Liberia or the West Indies, but theAmerican Civil War ended that effort. #DoResearch #BlackHistory #BlackArt #BlackHistoryArtSeries #AfricanHistory #KissMyBlackArts #KMBA #SeekKnowledge #SeekTruth #SlimBabyGfx #YoungBlackandGold #WeComeFromRoyalty #1000Network http://blackhistoryseries.tumblr.com

Doris “Dorie” Miller (October 12, 1919 – November 24, 1943) was a cook in the United States Navy noted for his bravery during the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. He was the first African American to be awarded the Navy Cross, the third highest honor awarded by the U.S. Navy at the time, after the Medal of Honor and the Navy Distinguished Service Medal. The citation accompanying the medal reads:

For distinguished devotion to duty, extraordinary courage and disregard for his own personal safety during the attack on the Fleet in Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, by Japanese forces on December 7, 1941. While at the side of his Captain on the bridge, Miller, despite enemy strafing and bombing and in the face of a serious fire, assisted in moving his Captain, who had been mortally wounded, to a place of greater safety, and later manned and operated a machine gun directed at enemy Japanese attacking aircraft until ordered to leave the bridge.

Nearly two years after Pearl Harbor, he was killed in action when the USS Liscome Bay was sunk by a Japanese submarine during the Battle of Makin. [x]

[Day 23 #BlackHistorySeries ]
#HenryHighlandGarnet (December 23, 1815 – February 13, 1882) was an African abolitionist, minister, educator and orator. An advocate of militant abolitionism, Garnet was a prominent member of the movement that led beyond moral suasion toward more political action. Renowned for his skills as a public speaker, he urged blacks to take action and claim their own destinies. For a period, he supported emigration of American free blacks to Mexico, Liberia or the West Indies, but theAmerican Civil War ended that effort. #DoResearch #BlackHistory #BlackArt #BlackHistoryArtSeries #AfricanHistory #KissMyBlackArts #KMBA #SeekKnowledge #SeekTruth #SlimBabyGfx #YoungBlackandGold #WeComeFromRoyalty #1000Network http://blackhistoryseries.tumblr.com