Africa-archives

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Andrew Putter: Native Work (Capetown, South Africa)

Gallery Statement:

This new installation comprises 21 black-and-white photographs of contemporary black Capetonians, in ‘tribal’ or ‘traditional’ costume in the genre of the iconic ethnographic photographer Alfred Martin Duggan-Cronin. These are displayed in a grid alongside the same subjects photographed in colour, where the sitters chose what they wished to wear based on how they see themselves.

'Cognizant of the dangers inherent in Duggan-Cronin's colonial, ethnographic approach to making images, Native Work nevertheless recognises an impulse of tenderness running through his project,’ writes Putter in an article about his project published recently in the journal Kronos: Southern African Histories. ’By trusting this impulse in Duggan-Cronin’s photographs, Native Work attempts to provoke another way of reading these images, and to use them in the making of new work motivated by the desire for social solidarity, a desire which emerges as a particular kind of historical possibility in the aftermath of apartheid.’

By exploring his own complex feelings towards an ideologically tainted but aesthetically compelling visual archive, Putter enters the fraught terrain of ethnographic representation to wrestle with himself about his own complicity, as an artist and a white South African, in this troubled visual legacy. Art critic Alex Dodd writes that this new work ‘constitutes one of those rare instances in which it becomes unmistakably clear to the viewer that the primacy of authorial intention has everything to do with the subtle alchemy that determines the meaning and affective power of images. In this case, the immense respect and tenderness that went into the making of the photographs registers visually as a kind of auratic quality of dignity that shines through each and every portrait.’

4

Distance and Desire: Encounters with the African Archive,” is a three-part exhibition of photographs from the Walther Collection, curated by the South African scholar Tamar Garb, with works that range from late-nineteenth-century photographs from southern Africa to pictures by present-day African and African-American artists. The final installment of the series, “Poetics and Politics,” is currently on view at the Walther Project Space, in Chelsea.

Click-through for a slide show of photographs from “Distance and Desire,” with captions abbreviated from the catalogue, followed by a Q. & A. with Garb: http://nyr.kr/10VCuoK

2

20 Years Since Nelson Mandela Became President Of South Africa

Today marks the 20th anniversary of Nelson Mandela beginning his presidency of South Africa after the country’s first multi-racial election.

President Nelson Mandela cheers during his tour of Johannebsurg and Cape Town, April - May 1995. Photo by Keith Bernstein

A supporter at ANC rally in South Africa peers from behind a sign bearing the image of their President, Nelson Mandela, April 1994. Photo by Tom Stoddart

Locust storm in Africa.

It’s tough to see but all of the white specks are locusts swarming. 

Kind of looks like the archives staff around a plate of cookies.

© The Field Museum, csz6119_LS, Photographer Carl Akeley.

Locust storm of insects.

Africa Expedition Zoology Mammals Africa D.G. Elliot, Carl Akeley, Mr. Dodson [London] Start Date: March 27, 1896 End Date: December 1, 1896

Lantern Slide 

4/1/1896

Philly Anti-Cap Presents: Let the Fire Burn - Free Screening @ LAVA

This documentary film follows Philadelphia’s MOVE Organization & their heated relationship (and conflict) with the Philadelphia Police Department, using archival footage. MOVE is a radical black liberation group with strong environmental leanings. (95 mins)

7pm
free snacks
show up early/on time for rowdy music videos before the film
stay later for discussion
Lava space (lancaster avenue autonomous space)
4134 Lancaster Ave
(43 bus or 10 trolley to 41st street)

SARTORIAL LOOKS #62
PHOTODOCUMENTARY | Oliver Tambo & Ronald Segal, days after the Sharpeville killings ca 1960s #SouthAfrica Photo by Ken Montano

Image courtesy of Africa Media Online. © Drum Social Histories / Baileys African History Archive / Africa Media Online.


Image | 1960 - Oliver Tambo - A few days after the Sharpevile killings Oliver tambo was in Cape Town when he heard that the government was about to ban the ANC and PAC. The ANC had already decided that if it was banned, Oliver should leave the country to continue the struggle abroad. Oliver’s friend Ronald Segal, (pictured left) drove him to Johannesburg from Cape Town and then continued their journey into Botswana. (Photo by Ken Montano)

Is it illegal to take pictures of the Square Kilometer Array?

Is it illegal to take pictures of the Square Kilometer Array?

After much legal wrangling, the South African government released the list of National Key Points to the media today. Previously, the National Key Points argument was used to protect various buildings and institutions from revealing information or being photographed, but the actual list has never been made public.

The SA History Archive (SAHA) and the Right2Know Campaign have been putting…

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Exclusive: Newly Discovered 1964 MLK Speech on Civil Rights, Segregation & Apartheid South Africa

Listen to the entire lost Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. speech from 1964: http://owl.li/HysSz (Democracy Now! and Pacifica Radio Archives exclusive broadcast.)

On December 7, 1964, days before he received the Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo, King gave a major address in London on segregation, the fight for civil rights and his support for Nelson Mandela and the anti-apartheid struggle in South Africa. The speech was recorded by Saul Bernstein, who was working as the European correspondent for Pacifica Radio. Bernstein’s recording was recently discovered by Brian DeShazor, director of the Pacifica Radio Archives. Today is the federal holiday that honors King.

To watch more Democracy Now! MLK Day specials, and interviews with many of King’s colleagues from the Civil Rights Movement, visit this in-depth page and our online archives:
http://www.democracynow.org/special/martin_luther_king_civil_rights

Democracy Now!, is an independent global news hour that airs weekdays on 1,300+ TV and radio stations Monday through Friday. Watch our livestream 8-9am ET: http://democracynow.org

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#CivilRightsMovement, #DailyEmail, #London, #NelsonMandela, #NobelPeacePrize, #PacificaRadioArchives, #SaulBernstein, #SouthAfrica, #Speech

SOUTH AFRICA, Johannesburg : ANC president Nelson Mandela is surrounded by young supporters after addressing residents at Phola Park, a squatter settlement east of Johannesburg, 31 May 1992. In his speech, he attacked President Frederik W. de Klerk of being responsible for the violence that killed scores of people in black townships. AFP PHOTO / WALTER DHLADHLA

Jooneed Khan on the political recuperation following Charlie Hebdo

Jooneed Khan on the political recuperation following Charlie Hebdo

Mauritian born journalist and author Jooneed Khan is our guest columnist. He comments on the political meaning for Africans of the “freedom of the press march” in Paris following the massacre at Charlie Hebdo and how they are perceived in Africa.

http://archives.ckut.ca/64/20150114.19.05-19.26.mp3

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Jooneed Khan on the political recuperation following Charlie Hebdo

Jooneed Khan on the political recuperation following Charlie Hebdo

Mauritian born journalist and author Jooneed Khan is our guest columnist. He comments on the political meaning for Africans of the “freedom of the press march” in Paris following the massacre at Charlie Hebdo and how they are perceived in Africa.

http://archives.ckut.ca/64/20150114.19.05-19.26.mp3

View On WordPress