Adam Van Wyk

Adam wrote, as well as illustrated, a cool Halloween story for our unintentionally secret little website.  A smart piece of fun, with nice character bits and, if I may adopt the cigar-gruffened tones of an old Hollywood producer, “A lotta heart, kid.”

(Starts here)

Storyboard artists

I’m not really sure where to look to find artists who genuinely do create storyboards for films but I’ve complied a few lists from online of some people that bloggers have said are ‘the best’ so hopefully looking at their work will help me to understand what it is that directors look for in storyboards. 

The List

Amy Lynn Umezu, Adrien Van Viersen, Adam Van Wyk, Aaron N. Feldman, David Allcock, Tony Liberatore. 

David Allcockhttp://www.davidallcock.com

Something that I’d never really considered when thinking about storyboarding was how in tune a storyboard artist must be with the director. Each of the examples on Allcocks website are so detailed and well annotated that It really would be easy to go out and make those diagrams a reality which I hadn’t expected. Each shot is quick yet full of shading and detail which is very impressive as each face gives the character expression and personality yet only provides the necessary information for the production team. Never truly understanding the true extent of how useful it is to have a good storyboarding artist on your side I had thought that they were used purely to give the rest to the production team a sense of what the director was going for and flesh out in the early stages some ideas but it is much more than that. Allcock’s style too is really special as although many of the storyboard artists that i’ve looked at have gone in for a similar look with lots of shading, his layouts I can see are much easier to understand than some of the more artistic approaches and much of his page is dedicated to explaining camera angle and the movement of objects in shot.

Adrien Van Viersenhttp://www.adrienvanviersen.com/storyboards/hulk/ 

With a very different style to Allcock, Van Viersen started off as a comic book artist but quickly became a famous storyboard artist after working on many television programmes and has now illustrated huge hits like X-men2, I-Robot, Incredible Hulk & Mission Impossible 4. With all annotation, notes and camera detail written outside of the frame Van Viersen’s style is very different in both layout and drawing. Although the simple clean lines and shading of Van Viersen’s work is cleaner than Allcock’s I think that I prefer the way that he captures movement and includes arrows to cut down the need for more frames. 

My style is proving to be very different as I start to map out some of my ideas as all of my filming is at night or in dark space and so i’ve found it increasingly difficult to keep the drawings low key. I am however really enjoying the way that I can put my ideas down on paper and it’s giving my the opportunity to really hone down what it is that i’m wanting my film to portray. Being able to see my ideas flowing on paper has dramatically helped me to think about what my film is going to say to people and recognise the way that different angles and focus points will change the feel of my film. For example my film could easily be really sinister but by experimenting with different arrangements of shots and pairings of imagery and audio I hope I will be able to make it more mysterious than scary.