Tonya Bundick to be sentenced for 2 Eastern Shore arsons

ACCOMAC, Va. (AP) — A woman accused of participating in an Eastern Shore arson spree is scheduled to be sentenced Thursday on charges stemming from two of the fires.

A jury convicted 41-year-old Tonya Bundick in August of setting a fire March 3, 2013, in Accomack County. In January, Bundick entered an Alford plea to arson and conspiracy stemming from an April 2013 fire in Melfa.

Thursday’s…

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BULLETIN - EAS ACTIVATION REQUESTED
TORNADO WARNING
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WAKEFIELD VA
702 PM EDT TUE JUN 18 2013

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN WAKEFIELD HAS ISSUED A

* TORNADO WARNING FOR…
CENTRAL ACCOMACK COUNTY IN SOUTHEAST VIRGINIA…

* UNTIL 730 PM EDT

* AT 659 PM EDT…LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTED A TORNADO NEAR PARKSLEY…OR 17 MILES NORTHEAST OF EXMORE. DOPPLER RADAR SHOWED THIS TORNADO MOVING EAST AT 25 MPH.

* THE TORNADO WILL AFFECT MAINLY RURAL AREAS OF CENTRAL ACCOMACK COUNTY…INCLUDING THE FOLLOWING LOCATIONS MODEST TOWN.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS…

TO REPEAT…A TORNADO IS ON THE GROUND. TAKE COVER NOW. MOVE TO AN INTERIOR ROOM ON THE LOWEST FLOOR OF A STURDY BUILDING. AVOID WINDOWS. IF IN A MOBILE HOME…A VEHICLE… OR OUTDOORS…MOVE TO THE CLOSEST SUBSTANTIAL SHELTER AND PROTECT YOURSELF FROM FLYING DEBRIS.

Accomack County and "Free Money"

Rigell’s efforts to try and streamline government red tape is a worthy endeavor. Sometimes government rules and regulations, be they federal, state or local, just don’t make sense or are in place to protect the interests of already entrenched business interests. Requiring licensing of hair braiders is a classic example of “rent seeking” rather than the free market advancing consumer options.

In the Accomack County case what we see is the  ”dog-whistle” of government red tape and interference in local job creation when in my opinion this is more properly a case of one party wanting to break a contract that they freely engaged.

As I understand it the property in question was a gift from a federal agency to the local authorities a few decades ago. It truly was a gift in that it was freely given to local authorities at no out of pocket cost to them. There was a proviso though that the property could only be used for recreational purposes and not commercial development.

Perhaps part of that reasoning was to prevent rampant development from encroaching upon the area around the Wallops Island launching facilities which could lead to the same sort of problems that NAS Oceana experiences and taxpayers have been stuck with paying millions of dollars to try and correct.

Apparently the property was not used for much and was somewhat forgotten about until recently.

With all the buzz of trying to increase private commercial activity in launching “stuff” into space there is interest in increasing the importance of the existing Wallops Island launch facilites as a major hub of orbital flight activities.

Along with an increase in those activities, of course, comes the need for development of commercial and residential property.

Thus the newfound interest in the property that was a gift from the federal government decades ago. However, the existing deed prevents the use of that property for any sort of commercial/residential use.

Given the fiscal problems of our federal government one would think that if the federal government has assets that are no longer considered “mission critical” and are desired for private use then the prudent course would be to offer that property for sale.

Makes sense to me and I am sure that makes sense to most people including most of the fine folks in VA-02.

So it seemed sensible and proper to me that the federal agency involved told the local officials that essentially “Well we gave you a piece of property many decades ago that you have essentially ignored but now that there is interest in private commercial development then in order for us to remove the deed restrictions you agreed to at that time we would be interested in selling that property and allow such development”.

In a sensible world, where developers buy property all the time, this should have been a similar situation and not have created any kind of kerfuffle. What makes this case different, of course, is that private businesses routinely look to get freebies, or subsidies from all levels of government (federal/state/local) and elected officials are almost always quickly ready to oblige in the ongoing game of corporate welfare.

Rep. Rigell, who on one hand decries the federal debt/deficit and government intrusion in our lives, was quick to use his power to intervene in what should have been a routine commercial transaction. Everyone wants something for nothing and our federal budget problems are the direct result of decades of that sort of thinking - give the people what they want but we’ll worry about them actually paying for later.

Rep. Rigell ran for office on the platform that he would be serious in addressing these fiscal problems. Yet, in this case, he has shown himself to be just another politican handing out welfare “free money”.

The efforts to try and develop the Wallops Island area as a space port are laudable. The efforts of Rep. Rigell and local officials to hand out corporate welfare are not.

Rep. Rigell’s Press Release: Rigell’s Jobs Bill Passes House of Representatives with Bipartisan Support 

A River (of Money) Runs Through It

Turns out it’s not just state government that relies on federal money to deliver essential services to Virginians: federal resources bolster the budgets of every one of Virginia’s 134 localities, too. From Wise County to Arlington; Accomack to Winchester; and everywhere in between.

Throughout the ongoing debate over closing the coverage gap, a key talking point for opponents has centered on distrust of the federal government and its ability to hold up its end of the bargain in funding almost all the costs of providing people with health insurance.

Well, if lawmakers question Virginia’s reliance on federal funds going to the state, then federal funds flowing to the localities in their districts should be of concern, too.

After all, it’s a lot of money.

Knowing that more than 21 percent of the state’s revenue comes from Washington, we decided to take a closer look at how much federal funding supports Virginia localities. That info is found in an annual report from the Auditor of Public Accounts that pulls together revenue and spending data for the commonwealth’s localities. It shows that over $1.9 billion in federal resources a year go to Virginia localities to help cover the cost of education, health care, and other essential public services.

Click on the image below to view tables that sum how much goes to the localities associated with each Virginia House and Senate district.

image

The fact is, Virginia relies on federal support for core services that people rely on at every level of government. So if lawmakers — or anyone else — were really concerned that the federal government can’t be relied upon to provide needed funding for closing the coverage gap, you’d think they’d also be busy shoring up education and all the other areas where federal funding helps cover the costs. But they aren’t. And why would they? The money is safe — just like the money Washington would spend to make sure more Virginians have medical care.

So who’s kidding who?

As lawmakers head back to Richmond Thursday for a special legislative session to debate expanding Medicaid in Virginia, it’s time to put the excuses aside and make the right decision on closing the coverage gap.

The deal before them is full federal funding of all the costs through 2016 and no less than 90 percent after that.

Too good to be true? Nope.

Too good to turn down? You bet.

—Sara Okos, Policy Director

Accomack County homicide, no suspects

ACCOMACK COUNTY, Va. (WAVY) – Deputies found a 35-year-old man shot and killed inside his home Thursday in Atlantic, Va.

When the Accomack sheriff’s office responded to a suspicious death report, officers found Jacques Duvual Fauntleroy decease in his house on Greta Road with gunshot wounds, according to Sheriff Todd Godwin. Investigators don’t have any suspect or cause of death information right…

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Mary N. Smith dream becoming reality - Delmarva Daily Times


Delmarva Daily Times

Mary N. Smith dream becoming reality
Delmarva Daily Times
The dream of transforming the school attended by Accomack County’s black students during segregation into a community center got a major boost with the award of a grant from the Eastern Shore of Virginia Community Foundation. The $40,000 grant, along …

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