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William S. Burroughs | Graphite on Paper | 40x50cm

Desperation is the raw material of drastic change.

Only those who can leave behind everything

they have ever believed in can hope to escape.

William S. Burroughs

Artprint by FineArtAmerica available here

Original Artwork for sale on my website.

For more of my art visit me on…

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10

Queer books out in September 2014, Part 2 of 2
Yup, there were two many awesome LGBTQ books coming out this month to fit them all in one roundup. You can find part 1 here.
[image description: the covers of ten books, listed below.]

POST CIVIL WAR FOOD- BISCUITS AND GRAVY - THE BISCUIT - DIED OUT IN ENGLAND- PRESERVED IN AMERICA

The dish gained regional distinction after the Civil War when food was in short supply.  Sawmill crews in Appalachian logging camps often survived on little more than coffee, biscuits and cream gravy—hence the popular term “sawmill gravy.” 

The biscuit emerged as a distinct food type in the early 19th century, before the American Civil War. Cooks created a cheap to produce addition for their meals that required no yeast, which was expensive and difficult to store.

Soft biscuits are common to Scotland and Guernsey and that the term biscuit as applied to a soft product was retained in these places, and in America, whereas in England it has completely died out…

Confederate Biscuits

2 cups flour

2 teaspoons baking powder

¼ teaspoon baking powder

1 teaspoon salt

6 tablespoons shortening

2/3 cup buttermilk

Sift together flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Cut in shortening until mixture is the consistency of meal. Stir in buttermilk. Form mixture into a ball; place on a floured surface and knead a few times. Pat out to about 1/4-inch thick. Cut with a small biscuit cutter. Place on an ungreased baking sheet and bake at 450 degrees for 8 to 10 minutes. Cut open and spread with a little butter.

http://www.ora.tv/brownbagwinetasting/article/alton-browns-ma-mays-biscuits—gravy-recipe

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/21/nyregion/recipes-adapted-from-cookbooks-of-the-civil-war-era.html?_r=0

Information from http://www.jacksonfreepress.com/news/2011/apr/06/its-all-gravy/

POST CIVIL WAR MYSTERY- THE ORIGINS OF CHICKEN AND WAFFLES

The exact origins of this dish are unknown, although several theories about its origin exist. During the Civil War fried chicken took on a new significance. The frying process made chicken less prone to spoilage, allowing women to send it to soldiers fighting in the battlefield.

1600’s.. the Pennsylvania Dutch were eating a version of Chicken and Waffles; however, instead of frying their poultry, they used boiled or roasted chicken, which was then shredded and put on top of waffles with gravy instead of syrup

Waffles entered American cuisine in the 1790s after Thomas Jefferson’s purchase of a waffle iron from France. Recipes for waffles and chicken soon appeared in cookbooks. Because African Americans in the South rarely had the opportunity to eat chicken and were more familiar with flapjacks or pancakes than with waffles, they considered the dish a delicacy. For decades, it remained “a special-occasion meal in African American families.”

Some historians place the origin later, after the post-Civil War migration of African Americans to the North. Fried chicken was a common breakfast meat, and serving “a breakfast bread with whatever meat [was available] comes out of the rural tradition.” The combination of chicken and waffles does not appear in early Southern cookbooks such as Mrs. Porter’s Southern Cookery Book, published in 1871 or in What Mrs. Fisher Knows About Old Southern Cooking, published in 1881 by former slave Abby Fisher. Fisher’s cookbook is generally considered the first cookbook written by an African American. The lack of a recipe for the combination of chicken and waffles in Southern cookbooks from the era may suggest a later origin for the dish.

Southern cooking would find its way up North, as slaves—freed after the Civil War—were lured by rumor of better jobs and opportunities. The dish can be found in the 1930s in such Harlem locations as Tillie’s Chicken Shack, Dickie Wells jazz nightclub, and Wells Supper Club

Serving up chicken & waffles”. Los Angeles Business Journal. September 22, 1997. p. 1.

http://www.theroot.com/articles/culture/2011/03/chicken_and_waffles_a_history_of_a_black_culinary_tradition.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicken_and_waffles

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