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The Curse of the Sad Mummy League of Legends Music Video

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SONG OF THE SEA

From the creators of the Academy Award®-nominated The Secret of Kells comes a breathtakingly gorgeous, hand-drawn masterpiece. Based on the Irish legend of the Selkies, Song of the Sea tells the story of the last seal-child, Saoirse, and her brother Ben, who go on an epic journey to save the world of magic and discover the secrets of their past. Pursued by the owl witch Macha and a host of ancient and mythical creatures, Saoirse and Ben race against time to awaken Saoirse’s powers and keep the spirit world from disappearing forever. As enthralling for adults as it is for children young and old, Song of the Sea is a wonder of magical storytelling and visual splendor that is destined to become a classic.

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Platonic Solids

A Platonic solid is a polyhedron where (1) each face is the same regular polygon, and (2) each vertex joins the same number of faces.

The Platonic solids are highly symmetrical, and, in three dimensions, only five such solids can exist: the tetrahedron, cube, octahedron, dodecahedron, and icosahedron.

This was first proven in Euclid’s Elements around 300 B.C., and has since been more rigorously proven using the Euler characteristic. The proofs are relatively easy to follow, and if you’re interested you can check them out both here and here.

Mathematica code:

pSolids={"Tetrahedron","Cube","Octahedron","Dodecahedron","Icosahedron"}
Manipulate[Graphics3D[
 {Opacity[0.8],Rotate[PolyhedronData[pSolids[[n]],"Faces"],th,{0,0,1}],
  Opacity[0],Circumsphere[PolyhedronData[pSolids[[n]],
    "VertexCoordinates"][[1;;4]]]},
 Boxed->False,SphericalRegion->True],{n,1,5,1},{th,0,2\[Pi]}]
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Towards the end of Epic, I pitched a credit concept to my director Chris Wedge. The idea was to create the illusion of being Leafman size, passing over all of Bomba’s research, scientific experiments, gadgets, calendars, photos, notes, books, etc. Chris bought off on the idea and my art director, Mike Knapp, gave me free reign to run with it on my own.   

I wanted to make these credits really personal to the great production team behind the film. Before composing anything, I went around the studio to supervisors, leads, directors, managers, and artists to get an idea what made each department unique. I was looking for inside jokes, production lingo, OOP things, extra curricular activities etc. I got to know a lot of artists I otherwise might have not met. I took notes on everybody. I learned that animation’s production manager had a funny finger-hair curling tendency during meetings. The assembly department joked that they could add 10-15% size to any asset before it broke but Wedge always wanted 20% more. Carl Ludwig, one of Blue Sky’s founders, met with me to explain the history of the studio and even gave me one of the first rendered images ever made. It was caustic glass and I added it into one of the credit pages (not featured here). I learned about people’s kids and families. I got birthdays, names and little doodles from their own desks. I made lists of interesting facts about each department. 

After getting fuel for the fire I got to work sketching out ideas for each department. I envisioned a photo-real look but we didn’t have the production budget to render things out. So instead, I would paint it myself and place composite assets together in photoshop.  I got onto the server and pulled assets from the test materials galleries. I brought in anything relevant to the page themes, modeled scissors, map graphics (done by the amazing David Dibble), BJ Crawford's bird studies, previous film items . Sometimes a test render came in looking too clean so I'd brush over it with paint and repaint shadows and highlights to match the lighting scheme. If I could save some time, I'd scan textures in. The cork board and corrugated cardboard are good examples of that. Co-workers wondered what I was trying to do with a 6 foot cork board and a 2 foot scanner! Some things I had to create myself like the dried clay surface and cherry wood desktop. I tried to sneak in drawings from everybody on the show into piles of paper simulated by stacking layers and artificial shadows. There are over 70 different artists featured in just these pages alone. That speaks to the immense talent I get to work with each day! I had fun creating graphic design logos and paper headers to bring some legitimacy to specific ideas. When I needed a fake business name or brand, I drew from my list of notes. I personalized every single credit page with all the tidbits. When Epic premiered at the Ziegfield theater I was delighted to watch the reactions as co-workers and families enjoyed a glancing insight into the fun we had making the movie. I won't keep blabbering on. Have a look for yourself and see what you can find. There is meaning behind every single bit of text and doodle. If you have hawk eyes, you'll spot my wife Anikah's name somewhere on each page.

I hope you enjoy them as much as I did!

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Hey peeps, here’s my Animation Showreel of the best of my university works. You can also see some sneaky peeks of the “Alchemists and the Dragon” in there too :)