Buy Oregon Replacement Part BEARING, BALL .787 1.85 MTD 741-0919 / 6204-2RS # 45-204 - most suitable Deal!! type of gas for craftsman lawn mower 917.370

Buy Oregon Replacement Part BEARING, BALL .787 1.85 MTD 741-0919 / 6204-2RS # 45-204 – most suitable Deal!! type of gas for craftsman lawn mower 917.370

Buy Oregon Replacement Part BEARING, BALL .787 1.85 MTD 741-0919 / 6204-2RS # 45-204
Check price type of gas for craftsman lawn mower 917 370

For alot more Information

Prices as of 06/15/2014 MDT Listprice :

$4.67

Price :
$6.00

You Save : Compare Prices with the help of Sellers Available From 5 Sellers About Shipping for checkout Details.

The Oregon…

View On WordPress

vimeo

I love all the wipes and constantly changing aspect ratio, which is often anchored to actions in the video. It’s also a really well used example of layering other video into the outsides of wider aspect ratios.

Metronomy - The Bayby David Wilson CreativeA music video for Metronomy set in Torquay, Devon.

Directed by David Wilson
Produced by Patrick Craig

Production Company - Colonel Blimp

Director of Photography - Richard Stewart
Styling by Cynthia Lawrence John
Art Direction by Tim Gibson

1st AD - James Dyer
Production Assistant - Genevieve Stevens

Aspect Ratio Change idea for my ToonTalker movie idea

Contact between the human world and the cartoon world can be considered one of the oldest special effects in Hollywood.

image

And my movie idea, ToonTalker, may be based—however loosely—on the time-proven concept and premise of having a real flesh-and-blood live action human being character visit an animated cartoon world.

My idea is to also change aspect ratios at the point my main real flesh-and-blood live action human being character gets sucked from the real world to a mostly 2d hand-drawn animated cartoon world that looks rather suspiciously like that of a Genndy Tartakovsky cartoon like Dexter’s Lab or Samurai Jack. Up until THAT scene, my ToonTalker movie idea should be set in a narrow 1.85:1 aspect ratio for the first opening twenty-to-twenty-five or so minutes.

Once my main real flesh-and-blood live action human being character, to be a young ten-year-old boy called Brandon, awakens in the Genndy Tartakovsky-style animated cartoon world with his flesh and blood human form unchanged, the aspect ratio should expand all the way to CinemaScope’s 2.35:1 or 2.39:1, the intention being to give the audience a sense of seeing the cartoon world through unchanged human eyes.

And before the aspect ratio change, I would only use a gritty, visceral color palette for the live action scenes, and once the aspect ratio change occurs, I would replace that gritty, visceral live action color palette with a vibrant, pristine and cartoony Genndy Tartakovsky cartoon color palette for the animated scenes in which Brandon is the only live action element along with some live props that Brandon handles, all to emphasize the feeling that, despite his unchanged human form, once in the cartoon world, Brandon is seeing the world in a whole new way or reality.

But to give you an example of what I call “The Incredible Changing Aspect Ratio”, however, take a gander below at these three images from the hand drawn Disney movie Brother Bear (2003):

image

image

image

That hand drawn animated Disney movie from 10 years ago began in a narrow 1.85:1 Academy Flat aspect ratio for the first 24 minutes (pillar-boxed or window-boxed within a 2.35:1 CinemaScope widescreen frame for the DVD and Blu Ray releases), but when the main character, Kenai, wakes up as a bear in the forest, the screen expands all the way to a 2.35:1 CinemaScope Widescreen format to give audiences a sense of seeing through the eyes of a bear.

So, anyway, what would you think of THAT idea?