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The Ventriloquist
(second year animation short)

Allright, sorry for all you non-magyars but this one is hungarian. This is the only animation i did at school that i dont think its 100% crap (i’d say its just around 50%). The gibberish the zombie and the chimp are yapping is from a hungarian radioplay called “Sötétedés után” (“After dark”), and its about two characters torturing each other and fighting about democracy - its all nonsense, what i wanted is to have the most fun animating them (im a fan of blocky-cheesy animation, sorry) and achieving a weird, creepy mood. Anyway, here it is.




8

 In a human hand there are 27 bones. Some apes have more. A gorilla has 32, five in each thumb. A human has 27. If you break an arm or a leg, the bone grows back together by calcification. It will be stronger than before. If you break a bone in your hand, it will never recover completely. Before every fight, you’ll think. In each slap, you’ll think. You’ll be careful. But at some point the pain will come back. Like needles. Like glass splinters.

'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.

'Beware the Jabberwock, my son!

The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
The frumious Bandersnatch!’

He took his vorpal sword in hand:
Long time the manxome foe he sought —
So rested he by the Tumtum tree,
And stood awhile in thought.

And as in uffish thought he stood,
The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,
And burbled as it came!

One, two! One, two! And through and through
The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!
He left it dead, and with its head
He went galumphing back.

'And hast thou slain the Jabberwock?
Come to my arms, my beamish boy!
O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!’
He chortled in his joy.

'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.
— Jabberwocky, Through The Looking Glass, by Lewis Carroll.




[Artwork by Michael Kutsche.]

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