*brideshead

I thought theatre people wouldn’t see me if I hadn’t trained. I didn’t want to just be the Brideshead guy, to spend the rest of my life wearing waistcoats. I got the chance to try everything. Not just Romeos, but pimps and grandfathers and even one role as a woman in a Naomi Wallace play called Slaughter City. (x)(x)

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(lit) FAVORITE MALE CHARACTER [3/?]: Sebastian Flyte

…extremely wealthy, quirky, beautiful young man who obeys his every impulse, shirks his duties, charms the pants off everyone, carries around a teddy bear named Aloysius, parties like a rock star, and makes his first introduction to Charles by leaning his head into our narrator’s first-floor dorm room window and puking up several bottles of wine.

Evelyn Waugh, Brideshead Revisited

Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austen
Lord of the Rings - JRR Tolkien  (partially only)

Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte
Harry Potter series - JK Rowling
To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee
The Bible - Council of Nicea
Wuthering Heights - Emily Bronte
Nineteen Eighty Four - George Orwell
His Dark Materials - Philip Pullman
Great Expectations - Charles Dickens
Little Women - Louisa M Alcott
Tess of the D’Urbervilles - Thomas Hardy
Catch 22 - Joseph Heller
Rebecca - Daphne Du Maurier
The Hobbit - JRR Tolkien
Birdsong - Sebastian Faulk
Catcher in the Rye - JD Salinger
The Time Traveller’s Wife - Audrey Niffenegger
Middlemarch - George Eliot
Gone With The Wind - Margaret Mitchell
The Great Gatsby - F Scott Fitzgerald
Bleak House - Charles Dickens
War and Peace - Leo Tolstoy
The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams
Brideshead Revisited - Evelyn Waugh
Crime and Punishment - Fyodor Dostoyevsky
Grapes of Wrath - John Steinbeck
Alice in Wonderland - Lewis Carroll
The Wind in the Willows - Kenneth Grahame
Anna Karenina - Leo Tolstoy
David Copperfield - Charles Dickens
Chronicles of Narnia - CS Lewis
Emma - Jane Austen
Persuasion - Jane Austen
The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe - CS Lewis
The Kite Runner - Khaled Hosseini
Captain Corelli’s Mandolin - Louis De Bernieres
Memoirs of a Geisha - Arthur Golden
Winnie the Pooh - AA Milne
Animal Farm - George Orwell
The Da Vinci Code - Dan Brown
One Hundred Years of Solitude - Gabriel Garcia Marquez
A Prayer for Owen Meaney - John Irving
The Woman in White - Wilkie Collins
Anne of Green Gables - LM Montgomery
Far From The Madding Crowd - Thomas Hardy
The Handmaid’s Tale - Margaret Atwood
Lord of the Flies - William Golding
Atonement - Ian McEwan
Life of Pi - Yann Martel
Dune - Frank Herbert
Cold Comfort Farm - Stella Gibbons
Sense and Sensibility - Jane Austen
A Suitable Boy - Vikram Seth
The Shadow of the Wind - Carlos Ruiz Zafon
A Tale Of Two Cities - Charles Dickens
Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time - Mark Haddon
Love In The Time Of Cholera - Gabriel Garcia Marquez
Of Mice and Men - John Steinbeck
Lolita - Vladimir Nabokov
The Secret History - Donna Tartt
The Lovely Bones - Alice Sebold
Count of Monte Cristo - Alexandre Dumas
On The Road - Jack Kerouac
Jude the Obscure - Thomas Hardy
Bridget Jones’s Diary - Helen Fielding
Midnight’s Children - Salman Rushdie
Moby Dick - Herman Melville
Oliver Twist - Charles Dickens
Dracula - Bram Stoker
The Secret Garden - Frances Hodgson Burnett
Notes From A Small Island - Bill Bryson
Ulysses - James Joyce
The Bell Jar - Sylvia Plath
Swallows and Amazons - Arthur Ransome
Germinal - Emile Zola
Vanity Fair - William Makepeace Thackeray
Possession - AS Byatt
A Christmas Carol - Charles Dickens
Cloud Atlas - David Mitchell
The Color Purple - Alice Walker
The Remains of the Day - Kazuo Ishiguro
Madame Bovary - Gustave Flaubert
A Fine Balance - Rohinton Mistry
Charlotte’s Web - EB White
The Five People You Meet In Heaven - Mitch Albom
Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
The Faraway Tree Collection - Enid Blyton
Heart of Darkness - Joseph Conrad
The Little Prince - Antoine De Saint-Exupery
The Wasp Factory - Iain Banks
Watership Down - Richard Adams
A Confederacy of Dunces - John Kennedy Toole
A Town Like Alice - Nevil Shute
The Three Musketeers - Alexandre Dumas
Hamlet - William Shakespeare
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory - Roald Dahl
Frankenstein - Mary Shelley
The Canterbury Tales - Geoffrey Chaucer
Paradise Lost - John Milton
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Mark Twain
White Fang - Jack London
The Portrait of Dorian Gray - Oscar Wilde
Queen of the Damned - Anne Rice
Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - Robert Louis Stevenson
The Call of the Wild - Jack London
The Importance of Being Earnest - Oscar Wilde
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz — L. Frank Baum

Don Quixote — Miguel De Cervantes
Where the Wild Things Are — Maurice Sendak
The Cat in the Hat — Dr Seuss

The Giver — Lois Lowry
Inkheart — Cornelia Funke
Divine Comedy — Dante Alighieri
Macbeth — William Shakespeare
Romeo and Juliet — William Shakespeare

The Child Called ‘It’ — Dave Pelzer
The Hunger Games — Suzanne Collins
The Diary of a Young Girl — Anne Frank

Night — Elie Wiesel
Les Misérables — Victor Hugo
The Odyssey — Homer
The Scarlet Letter — Nathaniel Hawthorne
The Brothers Karamasov — Fyodor Dostoyevsky
Eragon — Christopher Paolini

Some quotes from Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh, which I was flicking through this morning:

  1. “Sometimes, I feel the past and the future pressing so hard on either side that there’s no room for the present at all.”
  2. “The trouble with modern education is you never know how ignorant people are. With anyone over fifty you can be fairly confident what’s been taught and what’s been left out. But these young people have such an intelligent, knowledgeable surface, and then the crust suddenly breaks and you look down into depths of confusion you didn’t know existed.”
  3. “If you asked me now who I am, the only answer I could give with any certainty would be my name. For the rest: my loves, my hates, down even to my deepest desires, I can no longer say whether these emotions are my own, or stolen from those I once so desperately wished to be.

Still from the film adaptation (2008)

vimeo

Fade to White

What does it mean when a film fades to white? When a film ends with the more traditional fade to black, there tends to be a sense of closure. On the other hand, ending with the much less common fade to white seems to create a sense of ambiguity. When not used at the end of a film, fades to white are often used to express disorientation and euphoria, among many other similar sensations. Here is a look at a variety of films that utilize the fade to white for a variety of purposes.
MUSIC: “Für Alina” by Arvo Pärt