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Fecal transplants successful for treating C. difficile infection           

Distasteful though it sounds, the transplantation of fecal matter is more successful for treating Clostridium difficile infections than previously thought.

The research, published in the open access journal Microbiome, reveals that healthy changes to a patient’s microbiome are sustained for up to 21 weeks after transplant, and has implications for the regulation of the treatment.

Clostridium difficile infections are a growing problem, leading to recurrent cases of diarrhea and severe abdominal pain, with thousands of fatalities worldwide every year. The infection is thought to work by overrunning the intestinal microbiome - the ecosystem of microorganisms that maintain a healthy intestine.

Alexa Weingarden, Antonio Gonzalez, Yoshiki Vazquez-Baeza, Sophie Weiss, Gregory Humphrey, Donna Berg-Lyons, Dan Knights, Tatsuya Unno, Aleh Bobr, Johnthomas Kang, Alexander Khoruts, Rob Knight and Michael J Sadowsky

Dynamic Changes in Short- and Long-Term Bacterial Composition Following Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection

Microbiome 2015

DOI: 10.1186/s40168-015-0070-0 

"Có người hỏi Thượng đế, thích so với yêu có gì khác biệt? Thượng đế liền chỉ tay về phía một đứa trẻ. Chỉ thấy cậu bé đứng trước một bông hoa, bị vẻ đẹp của hoa làm cho mê đắm, không nhịn được mà đưa tay ngắt bông hoa xuống. Thượng đế nói, đây chính là thích. Sau đó, Thượng đế lại chỉ tay về phía một đứa trẻ khác. Chỉ thấy cậu bé đang ướt đẫm mồ hôi tưới nước cho hoa, lại lo lắng hoa sẽ bị ánh nắng mặt trời gay gắt làm cho khô héo, nên tự mình đứng trước che nắng cho hoa. Thượng đế nói, đó chính là yêu. Cho nên, thích là vì có được, nhưng yêu tức là cho đi."

● Rainie Nguyen dịch@Ai rồi cũng phải đi

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"Nếu lơ là, sẽ có ai đó đâm sau lưng mình. Nếu mở lòng, sẽ có ai đó tiến vào và làm mình tổn thương. Nhưng dù vậy cũng không sao. Nếu như có người có thể thực sự tin tưởng và dựa vào, dù chỉ một người thôi… thì cho dù có bị đâm bao lần đi nữa, cũng không cảm thấy đau đớn đến mức ấy."

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des by MyCoi@Kites Quotes

Excuse my language, but this is fucking bullshit. Having a csection is the farthest thing from “lucking out”. The recovery is 10 times worse and you lose that immediate bonding experience with your baby. I was induced and in labor for 45 hours and I tried to push for 45 minutes before I finally decided to have a csection. If I hadn’t finally decided to have a csection and continued to try and push Taegan out, I would have been rushed to an emergency csection and put to sleep because my epidural had failed and there’s no time for a spinal tap in an emergency csection. The doctor checked me after I opted for a csection and told me that even with the use of forceps, there was no way she was coming out vaginally. I missed out on that immediate bonding with my daughter, I didn’t get to hold her or anything until two hours later. I’m glad I chose to have a csection because at least I got to hear her cry and get a quick look at her because I know some women aren’t that lucky. Vaginal births are not superior. Birth is birth and no matter what you still brought a baby into this world one way or another. I’m sick of the stigma that comes with csections. Whether you opt to have one or whether it was an emergency, no woman is any less a mother than the women who had a vaginal birth. I’m sick of the stigma that comes with having a csection because most of us hate the fact we couldn’t do what our bodies were “made to do”. So please, think before you judge a woman for having a csection. She or her baby could have died without it, for all you know, and you judging her doesn’t make it any better. I would have loved to had a natural birth, and almost 8 weeks later, I still get upset over not being able too and still wish I could change how my birth went because it was traumatizing. But I made the best decision for my daughter and it wasn’t as traumatic as being rushed into an emergency csection.